Monday, April 14, 2014

Happy Khalsa Da Sajna Divas

Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa
Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh

Happy Khalsa Da Sajna Divas/Vaisakhi Day
The nagar keertan in Prince George will be on May 17, 2014. Stay tuned for more updates. 




Wednesday, January 1, 2014

Happy New Year !!!
As we move forward into 2014, let's all take a moment to reflect back on the events of 2013.
PG Sikh Youth wish you the best of luck in 2014. May this year bring you love, prosperity, happiness, and may it bring you closer to Waheguru and Guru's shabd.

Sikh Photos Calendar
From mrsikhnet.com

Thursday, December 26, 2013

Shaheedi of Sahibzada Zorawar Singh, Sahibzada Fateh Singh, and Mata Gujri

From www.sikhiwiki.org
 
 
As the year approaches the end, on December 26 every year, the global world Sikh community commemorate the martyrdom of three of their most loved figures of the Guru household. On this darkest of days, their youngest hero and bravest comrade of Sikhism, Sahibzada Fateh Singh (1699-1705) who was the youngest of Guru Gobind Singh's four sons, Sahibzada Zorawar Singh (1696-1705), his elder brother and Mata Gujar Kaur ji, his grandmother sacrificed their lives for their faith and the right to remain Sikhs.

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

Second battle of Chamkaur Sahib

From www.sikhiwiki.org


A Story of Bravery and Sacrifice
The Battle of Chamkaur, also known as the Second battle of Chamkaur was a battle fought between the Khalsa, led by Guru Gobind Singh, against the Mughal army and Ajmer Chand's league of Rajput Hill Chieftains. The period of this Battle in Chamkaur is 21,22 and 23 December 1704 [6,7,8 Poh Samat 1761 Bikrmi]. Guru Gobind Singh with his entourage left Anandpur Sahib at the night of 20 December 1704.

Guru Gobind Singh makes a reference to this battle in the Zafarnamah. He tells how a huge (Dahlakh) army [1][2] attacked his Sikhs who were only forty in number and without food. In spite of their numerical strength, the Mughal soldiers were unable to kill or capture the Guru. The Guru also talks of cowardice of one of the Mughal generals and how he hid himself behind a wall, not having the courage to face the Guru.

Saturday, November 16, 2013

Happy Gurpurb!!!!!

Happy Guru Nanak Dev Ji's Gurpurb

It is Guru Nanak Dev Ji's Gurpurb on November 17, 2013. Let's take a moment to reflect on our first Guru and join the sangat in celebration.

Artist Bodh Rai's immpression of Guru Nanak Dev ji
 
ਰਾਗ੝ ਧਨਾਸਰੀ ਮਹਲਾ ੧ ॥
  

ਗਗਨ ਮੈ ਥਾਲ੝ ਰਵਿ ਚੰਦ੝ ਦੀਪਕ ਬਨੇ ਤਾਰਿਕਾ ਮੰਡਲ ਜਨਕ ਮੋਤੀ ॥

Upon that cosmic plate of the sky, the sun and the moon are the lamps. The stars and their orbs are the studded pearls.
 
ਧੂਪ੝ ਮਲਆਨਲੋ ਪਵਣ੝ ਚਵਰੋ ਕਰੇ ਸਗਲ ਬਨਰਾਇ ਫੂਲੰਤ ਜੋਤੀ ॥੧॥

The fragrance of sandalwood in the air is the temple incense, and the wind is the fan. All the plants of the world are the altar flowers in offering to You, O Luminous Lord. ((1))
 
ਕੈਸੀ ਆਰਤੀ ਹੋਇ ॥

What a beautiful Aartee, lamp-lit worship service this is!
 
ਭਵ ਖੰਡਨਾ ਤੇਰੀ ਆਰਤੀ ॥

O Destroyer of Fear, this is Your Ceremony of Light.
 
ਅਨਹਤਾ ਸਬਦ ਵਾਜੰਤ ਭੇਰੀ ॥੧॥ ਰਹਾਉ ॥

The Unstruck Sound-current of the Shabad is the vibration of the temple drums. ((1)(Pause))
 
ਸਹਸ ਤਵ ਨੈਨ ਨਨ ਨੈਨ ਹਹਿ ਤੋਹਿ ਕਉ ਸਹਸ ਮੂਰਤਿ ਨਨਾ ਝਕ ਤਹੀ ॥

You have thousands of eyes, and yet You have no eyes. You have thousands of forms, and yet You do not have even one. 
 
ਸਹਸ ਪਦ ਬਿਮਲ ਨਨ ਝਕ ਪਦ ਗੰਧ ਬਿਨ੝ ਸਹਸ ਤਵ ਗੰਧ ਇਵ ਚਲਤ ਮੋਹੀ ॥੨॥

You have thousands of Lotus Feet, and yet You do not have even one foot. You have no nose, but you have thousands of noses. This Play of Yours entrances me. ((2)) 
 
ਸਭ ਮਹਿ ਜੋਤਿ ਜੋਤਿ ਹੈ ਸੋਇ ॥

Amongst all is the Light-You are that Light.
 
ਤਿਸ ਦੈ ਚਾਨਣਿ ਸਭ ਮਹਿ ਚਾਨਣ੝ ਹੋਇ ॥

By this Illumination, that Light is radiant within all.
 
ਗ੝ਰ ਸਾਖੀ ਜੋਤਿ ਪਰਗਟ੝ ਹੋਇ ॥

Through the Guru's Teachings, the Light shines forth.
 
ਜੋ ਤਿਸ੝ ਭਾਵੈ ਸ੝ ਆਰਤੀ ਹੋਇ ॥੩॥

That which is pleasing to Him is the lamp-lit worship service. ((3))
 
ਹਰਿ ਚਰਣ ਕਵਲ ਮਕਰੰਦ ਲੋਭਿਤ ਮਨੋ ਅਨਦਿਨ ਮੋਹਿ ਆਹੀ ਪਿਆਸਾ ॥

My mind is enticed by the honey-sweet Lotus Feet of the Lord. Day and night, I thirst for them.
 
ਕ੝ਰਿਪਾ ਜਲ੝ ਦੇਹਿ ਨਾਨਕ ਸਾਰਿੰਗ ਕਉ ਹੋਇ ਜਾ ਤੇ ਤੇਰੈ ਨਾਇ ਵਾਸਾ ॥੪॥੩॥

Bestow the Water of Your Mercy upon Nanak, the thirsty song-bird, so that he may come to dwell in Your Name.
 
(From Kirtan Sohila, taken from www.sikhiwiki.org)

Friday, May 10, 2013

Relay for Life 2013

We are heading out to the Canadian Cancer Society's Relay for Life 2013 tomorrow, at Masich Place Stadium at 10 am. We expect all the team members to join us in support of this fundraiser. You can also donate at the event, on behalf of the Guru Nanak Sikh Team.

Sunday, April 14, 2013

Happy Vaisakhi

Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa
Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh
Vaisakhi
 


April 13, 2013 is Khalsa Da Janam Divas (Anniversary of the "Founding of the Khalsa") and the first day of Vaisakhi. Congratulations to everyone and we hope that you enjoy the celebrations wherever you are.

History from www.sikhiwiki.org

On Baisakhi Day, March 30, 1699, hundreds of thousands of people gathered around his divine temporal seat at Anandpur Sahib.  The Guru addressed the congregants with a most stirring oration on his divine mission of restoring their faith and preserving the Sikh religion. After his inspirational discourse, he flashed his unsheathed sword and said that every great deed was preceded by an equally great sacrifice: Then calling out to the assembled crowd, 'My sword is hungry for a head', He demanded one head for oblation. After some trepidation one person offered himself for the Guru's 'great sacrifice'. The Guru took him inside a tent. A little later the Guru came out of the tent, his sword dripping with fresh blood only to ask for another head. One by one four more earnest devotees offered their heads. Every time the Guru took a person inside the tent, he came out with his sword dripping fresh blood.

Thinking their Guru had gone mad and afraid He would ask for more heads some of the congregation started to disperse when suddenly the Guru emerged with all five men dressed piously in white and in a new ceromony that changed the way that one became a Sikh the Guru now initiated the five into a new and unique order of Sikhs. The ceremony was called pahul, what Sikhs today know as the baptism ceremony or Amrit Shakna. Then the Guru asked the first five Khalsa Sikhs to baptise him, in the same manner. He then proclaimed that the Panj Pyare -- the Five Beloved Ones -- would be the embodiment of the Guru himself.

At the same time the Guru gave his new Khalsa a unique, indisputable, and distinct identity. The Guru gave the gift of bana, the distinctive Sikh clothing and headwear. He also offered five emblems of purity and courage. These symbols, worn by all baptised Sikhs of both sexes, are popularly known today as Five K's: kesh, unshorn hair; Kanga, the wooden comb; Karra, the iron (or steel) bracelet; Kirpan, the sword; and Kachera, the underwear. By being identifiable, no Sikh could never hide behind cowardice again.